His idea of crowdfunding. A potato salad!

We all like stand-up comedies, great jokes, a good prank, but what about a huge Kickstarter success, worth more than $55.000 and the craziest joke ever in crowdfunding? It’s just for laugh, gags. And it’s worth every penny. This is Zack Danger Brown’s idea of a campaign. The man had guts, and realism too: he wanted to raise $10 to make a potato salad. Well, his idea of a Kickstarter campaign was like a slap in many people’s faces and like a hell of a good joke to others.

crowdfunding

Crowdfunding starts with a potato

Surely, when you hear a word like ‘crowd-funding’ you either do shop-talk, or think of an annoying buzzword, so, it’s not supposed to be funny, easy-going and surprisingly simple. Well, not to Zack Brown’s mind. His idea of crowd-funding was a potato salad. Not a startup, or a technological breakthrough, or an artsy thing, nope. The risks and challenges felt huuuge: ‘It might not be that good. It’s my first potato salad.’

It feels like this man did crowd-funding for crowdfunding‘s sake. Just to try it out and see how that feels. I think that now he can add: it feels rather good!

So, he got into Kickstarter like a jester. I guess we could all appreciate his confidence and sense of humor. Shortly afterwards, he became a success on the media and in the crowd-funding field, and he stretched his goals. He had only one month left, and he’d raised about $2000 – fulfilling his initial goal by 200%. On the 2nd of July when his campaign ended, he’d raised a surprising – and to some ironic and annoying – $55.492, having 6.911 backers. It’s clear that this man saw more at a potato, than there was to it. No, it wasn’t money. He was as much taken aback by the project’s financial potential, as were his fans. It was something else. Everyone likes being part of a good old trick, for little money. Who wouldn’t like giving away a few dollars just to brag: I’m part of this! You know this man, know what his done? Yeah, I’ve been part of it too.

The result: a huge laugh, charity and the PotatoStock 2014 music festival in late September, in which about $25.000 will be invested, along with fulfilling other stretch goals.

He didn’t have to wait much to stretch his goals. These were funny enough too. At reaching a $75 goal he offered a Pizza Party – yes, where pizza was served, not potato salad – at $100 he pledged he’d learn two potato salad recipes. When the $1000 was to be reached, he offered a live stream of the potato salad making and at $1200 he’d pay someone “to film a thank-you video for all of my backers!”, while the biggest stretch goal was the $3000, at which point he’d rent a party hall and invite “the whole internet to the potato salad party”.

Potato crowd-funding takes it all

Many articles and posts appeared in the media dubbing Zack Brown “the potato salad man” and a  crowd-funding troll, while some are ranting over the success of his campaign in face of all the serious, more “deserving” ones. Ben Kuchera entitles his post: The potato salad Kickstarter is better than your crowdfunding campaign. He gives credit to the general opinion, both pro and against this winner, saying that some even argue that Kickstarter went too far, but he also points out why this campaign was better than many others. This happens because this man doesn’t just sell a potato salad, but a good joke: the laugh, absurdity and the novelty of it. It’s easy, fun and down-to-earth.

People did want to be part of this crazy crowdfunding success. The potato salad is one huge success. Sometimes, being crazy and fun pays. Would you consider doing something like this?

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Ligia Mangra

Content Writer at Squirrly
A passionate writer. I love seeing a full moon and I like to rock 'n roll in life. Can't wait till my first novel gets published. Thumbs up, it'll be a fantasy horror!
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